Shultz, Bernard

Bernard Shultz

Born: October 6, 1922
Hometown: Newport News, VA
Class: 1945
Service: Merchant Marine
Position / Rank: Deck Cadet
Date / Place of death: July 18, 1944 / Milne
Bay, New Guinea
Date / Place of burial: July 1944 / Grave #265,
U.S. Army Air Force Cemetery #2, Milne Bay, New Guinea; February 7, 1949 / Mount Carmel Cemetery, Queens, NY
Age: 21

 

Bernard Shultz signed on as Deck Cadet aboard the MV Cape Ugat at San Francisco,
CA on February 4, 1944. He joined Cadet-Midshipman William N. Johnson who also
signed on as Deck Cadet on February 2. The ship made one voyage to the Pacific and
had returned to Los Angeles to load cargo.

According to the ship’s Official Log Book, at 0800 on June 6, 1944, two days after
sailing from Los Angeles, Bernard Shultz, “reported something in throat” to the Master.
He was relieved of duty and placed in the Sick Bay, where he was given a course of the
antibiotic sulfadiazine, hot packs, and a modified diet. Almost three weeks later the
Cape Ugat arrived at Milne Bay, New Guinea. At 2030 on June 26, 1944, a few hours
after the ship arrived, Cadet-Midshipman Shultz was taken ashore to U.S. Army Station
Hospital #174. After several blood transfusions and operations Cadet-Midshipman
Bernard Shultz died on July 18 of acute Ludwig’s Angina. This is an infection of the
lower mouth usually caused by dental treatment such as the removal of a tooth.

Cadet-Midshipman Bernard Shultz was posthumously awarded the Pacific War Zone
Bar, the Victory Medal, and the Presidential Testimonial Letter.

Bernard Shultz was the oldest son of Sam Shultz and Malle Glick Shultz. Before being
accepted to Kings Point, Bernard Shultz enlisted in the Naval Reserve on September
11, 1942 and was called to Active Duty as an Aviation Cadet on April 14, 1943.
However, he was discharged on September 2, 1943 so that he could report to Kings
Point. He was appointed a Midshipman, MMR, USNR on October 25, 1943.

According to Bernard Shultz’ uncle, at the time of Bernard’s death his father, brother, and another uncle were all in the area aboard U.S. Navy ships, but did not know he was in the area.

One of Bernard Shultz’ cousins provided the following poem written by Bernard while he was at Kings Point.

 

I am a Jew. Most of the boys here are Catholics or Protestants.

They are my friends so I went with them to the Christmas party at the base.

 

The choir sang a hymn. I don’t know the name, but I can recognize the tune.

It has the word, “Peace on earth, Good will to men.”

 

I heard several boys sniffle.  There were tears in the eyes of several boys near me.  My eyes were moist. I felt sorry for these boys, most of whom were away for the first Christmas. They were here instead, though they didn’t know why.

 

They knew this country was at war.  I knew too. They knew we had to fight this war.  I knew too.

They knew we had to win this war.  They knew it, so did I. But they did not know why we had to fight.

G_D, one man had a sword, and one man had a shield. So a larger sword was made, and for every defense invented, a greater weapon was invented, a greater weapon was created.

 

G_D, why must we fight? Why can’t man live with man?

 

Why must we be always destroying each other?

 

G_D, I am not speaking to you in the name of Abraham or Jesus:

 

I’m asking you in the names of all the men who have suffered because of war.

 

I’m asking in the name of every woman who gave up her man!

 

3 thoughts on “Shultz, Bernard

  1. Poem written by Bernard Schultz, USMM Cadet Midshipman, 1st Class, December 1943, California. Sent in by E. Gottlieb ; he had received the poem from Ben Glick, uncle of Bernard Schultz.
    “I am a Jew. Most of the boys here are Catholics or Protestants
    They are my friends so I went with them to the Christmas Party at the base.

    The choir sang a hymn. I don’t know the name, but I can recognize the tune.
    It has the words, “Peace on earth, Good will to men.”

    I heard several boys sniffle. There were tears in the eyes of several boys sitting near me. My eyes were moist. I felt sorry for these boys, most of whom were away from home for the first Christmas. They were here, instead, though they didn’t know why.

    They knew this country was at war. I knew too.
    They knew we had to fight to this war. I knew too.
    They knew we had to win this war. They knew it, and so did I.

    But they did not know why we had to fight.

    G-d, one man had a sword, and one man had a shield. So a larger sword was made, and for every defense invented, a greater weapon was created.

    G-d, why must we fight? Why can’t man live with man?
    Why must we be always destroying each other?

    G-d, I am not speaking to you in the name of Abraham or Jesus;
    I’m asking you in the names of all the men who have suffered because of war.
    I’m asking you in the name of every woman who gave up her man!

    Bernard Schultz, USMM Cadet Midshipman, 1st Class, December 1943, California.

    • Apparently Bernard Schultz was an Orthodox Jew; thus I would prefer to keep the poem as he wrote it for following reason:
      “Judaism does not prohibit writing the Name of God per se; it prohibits only erasing or defacing a Name of God. However, observant Jews avoid writing any Name of God casually because of the risk that the written Name might later be defaced, obliterated or destroyed accidentally or by one who does not know better. Observant Jews avoid writing a Name of God on web sites like this one because there is a risk that someone else will print it out and deface it. To avoid writing the Name, Orthodox Jews (and sometimes other denominations) substitute letters or syllables, for example, writing “G-d” instead of “God.” This entry was written by an observant Jew. http://www.jewishvirtuallibrary.org/jsource/Judaism/name.html

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